“Trikes” – to make a living

Trikes  are  very  famous  in the Philippines.  A city  in the Philippines without  a  trike   is  like  a man without  a  leg.  Trikes,  as  we  very  well know  them,   are  actually  tricycles  –   a  motorcycle  from 50 to 125 cc  with  a  sidecar  that  could  load  passengers,  food  products,  construction  materials,    name  it  and  the  “trike”  can load them  up  for  you.   A  mode  of  transportation  for  all seasons –  so  to speak.  

 Trikes  in the Philippines  are  proliferating   like  mushrooms  sprouting  after  a  sudden   downpour.   They  are  practically  in  every nook and  corner  in the Philippines.  Because  for  short  distances,  it  is  the  easiest  transport to  move  about  and  you can  just  ignore  the  Jeepney,  bus,  or  taxi.   But  what  makes the  trike  different is that,  it  is the  cheapest  vehicle any person  can  travel  on,  “fast enough” ,    because  of  its  ability  to  traverse  small alleys and  streets.

Although  it  is  helping  a  lot  of  Filipinos  earn  their  keep to  survive,  tricycles  are  also considered   traffic  “nuisance”  by  many.   Not  only  because they   make   a lot of  noise,  they  likewise  emit  smelly  CO2   to  the    air,   and   at  times,  “trike”  drivers   take  no  heed  at  all   on  traffic   rules.  More often  than  not,  you could  see  tricycles  plying  along  the  main  thoroughfares.   And the amount  of traffic   a  “trike”  could  cause irritates  some,  some  are  unmindful  though,   while  others  have  the opinion  that  tricycles  degrade the  social  standards  of   the  country.  Tricycle   drivers  are known  to  be people  who  didn’t  reach  any form  of  formal   education  be  elementary  or   high  school or  they  are  school  drop-outs.  In short,   it  is  a  poor man’s  profession.    

No one can account  for  the  origin  of  tricycle,  but  I  would  venture  to say  that  it  is  a  remake  of   the  tricycles   Germans  use  during  World War  II  when   invasion  of  Europe  was  being  carried  out.   That is  the  historical   aspect  of  a  tricycle.   In  the  Philippines,  tricycles have a more   social  aspect  on   why  it has become  a popular  choice  of   job  for  those who no longer  seek  further advancement  or  can’t  find  better  employment.   

There  is  a lot  of  things  to  be  desired  from  the  Philippine  transport  system.   Tricycles  have  become  part  of  that  system,  despite   inefficiency,  inconvenience,  impracticality,  insecurity and most  of  all  they  do  not display  progress and  development,    nor  it  solves  employment  issues  because  it  is  a  precarious  type  of  job.    Despite   many   “nots”,  tricycles  have  taken a  role  in the Filipino  social   life.   They  are  tolerated.  It  could  be  a  “well-being”  for   many  poor,   so that  our  authorities  no longer   take  time  out  to control  their multiplication.   But a  tricycle  doesn’t  evolve  itself  to become  secured, efficient, practical,  or  convenient.   Tricycles´  only  evolution  is  its  growth  in number.   However,  at  this  point  in time,  nobody  is making a move  to eradicate   tricycles,  and   I repeat,  despite  the  list  of “not´s”.     So  it  seems  that  there  is  no other  choice,  but  to  live  with “trikes” and  die  with  “trikes”. 

Thanks for your  time….Eric

PLEASE  CHECK ON  THE    “NEW  ENTRIES”  IN  THE   INTERNATIONAL   JOBS  OPPORTUNITIES  SECTION   WHICH   MAY  INTEREST  YOU  OR  YOU MAY  RECOMMEND  IT  TO YOUR  RELATIVES  OR  FRIENDS  WHO  ARE  SEEKING  EMPLOYMENT  ABROAD.

 

 

Advertisements

Published by

2 thoughts on ““Trikes” – to make a living

  1. Yes, “trikes” are the most popular mode of transportation for many, yet, they are traffic nuisances.

    Like

Comments are closed.